Wonder Woman

On seeing the word – wonder, the image of the great women – Wonder Women came in my mind. Recently, we pass away the Women’s Day. Why is it celebrated, it’s a tribute to us from all other for being such a wonderful person and in this or that way, we all are a Wonder Women.

But before comparing us with this heroic charecter, we should know the history of her.

She is the Princess Diana of Themyscira, Daughter of Hippolyta. Though, she is a fictional comic charecter of comic book that was published by DC Comic, she is the heroine that lives in the heart of each and every woman or girl.
This character first appeared in All Star Comics in October 1941 and first cover-dated on Sensation Comics January 1942. When blending into the society outside of her homeland, she adopts her civilian identity Diana Prince. The character is also referred as the “Amazing Amazon”, the “Spirit of Truth”, “Themyscira’s Champion”, the “God-Killer”, and the “Goddess of Love and War”.

Her Story

Her mother – Queen Hippolyta sculpted her from clay and she was given life by Aphrodite, along with superhuman powers as gifts by the Greek gods.

She is the daughter of Zeus and Hippolyta and jointly raised by her mother and her aunts Antiope and Menalippe.

She has muscular sexy look and emphasized her Amazonian heritage.Wonder Woman’s Amazonian training helped her to develop a wide range of extraordinary skills in tactics, hunting, and combat. She possesses an arsenal of advanced technology, including the Lasso of Truth, a pair of indestructible bracelets, a tiara which serves as a projectile, and a range of devices based on Amazon technology.


Wonder Woman’s character was created during World War II. The character in the story was initially depicted fighting Axis military forces as well as an assortment of colorful supervillains. On course of time, her stories came to place greater emphasis on characters, deities, and monsters from Greek mythology. Many stories depicted Wonder Woman rescuing herself from bondage, which defeated the “damsels in distress” trope that was common in comics during the 1940s. In the decades, Wonder Woman has gained a cast of enemies bent on eliminating the Amazon, including classic villains such as Ares, Cheetah, Doctor Poison, Circe, Doctor Psycho, and Giganta, along with more recent adversaries such as Veronica Cale and the First Born.

Wonder Woman has also regularly appeared in comic books featuring the superhero teams Justice Society (from 1941) and Justice League (from 1960).

Invention

William Moulton Marston, wanted to create his own new superhero. Marston’s wife Elizabeth suggested to him that it should be a woman.

William Moulton Marston, a psychologist already famous for inventing the polygraph, struck upon an idea for a new kind of superhero, one who would triumph not with fists or firepower, but with love. “Fine,” said Elizabeth. “But make her a woman.”

Marston developed Wonder Woman, whom he believed to be a model of that era’s unconventional, liberated woman. Marston also drew inspiration from the bracelets worn by Olive Byrne.
Marston designed Wonder Woman to be an allegory for the ideal love leader, the kind of women who (he believed) should run society.

Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, and power. Not wanting to be girls, they don’t want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are. Women’s strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.
—Marston

Recently, Wonder Woman wears a costume similar to her original Marston costume, utilizes a sword and shield, and has a completely new origin.

No longer a clay figure brought to life by the magic of the gods, instead, she is a demi-goddess and the natural-born daughter of Hippolyta and Zeus.

Ability

She is masterful athlete, acrobat, fighter and strategist, trained and experienced in many ancient and modern forms of armed and unarmed combat, including exclusive Amazonian martial arts.

In some versions, her mother trained her, as Wonder Girl, for a future career as Wonder Woman. From the beginning, she is portrayed as highly skilled in using her Amazon bracelets to stop bullets and in wielding her golden lasso.Batman once called her the “best melee fighter in the world”.
She was able to heal faster than a normal human being due to her birthright consumption of water from Paradise Island’s Fountain of Eternal Youth. She also had an array of mental and psychic abilities.

  • Pallas Athena, the goddess of wisdom and war, granted Diana great wisdom, intelligence, and military prowess.
  • Artemis, goddess of the hunt, animals, and the Moon, graced Diana with the Eyes of the Hunter and unity with beasts, meaning Diana can communicate with all animals, including dinosaurs.
  • Hestia, goddess of hearth and home, granted Diana sisterhood with fire.
  • Hermes, the messenger god of speed, granted Diana superhuman speed and the ability to fly
  • Aphrodite, goddess of love, bestowed Diana with stunning beauty, as well as a kind heart.

Diana was a member of a tribe of women called the Amazons, native to Paradise Island – a secluded island set in the middle of a vast ocean. Captain Steve Trevor‘s plane crashes on the island and he is found alive but unconscious by Diana and fellow Amazon, and friend, Mala. Diana has him nursed back to health and falls in love with him. A competition is held amongst all the Amazons by Diana’s mother, the Queen of the Amazons Hippolyta, in order to determine who is the most worthy of all the women. Hippolyta charges the winner with the responsibility of delivering Captain Steve Trevor back to Man’s World and to fight for justice. Hippolyta forbids Diana from entering the competition, but she takes part nonetheless, wearing a mask to conceal her identity. She wins the competition and reveals herself, surprising Hippolyta, who ultimately accepts, and must give in to, Diana’s wish to go to Man’s World. She then is awarded a special uniform made by her mother for her new role as Wonder Woman and safely returns Steve Trevor back to his home country.

So, it’s been a lot of this wonderful woman, about her origin, her life, her live life and truly she is wonderfully created.

But, now let’s find some real life wonder women

Sappho (circa 570 BCE) One of the first known female writers. Much of her poetry has been lost but her immense reputation has remained. Plato referred to Sappho as one of the great 10 poets.

Cleopatra (69 BCE–30 BCE) The last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt. Cleopatra sought to defend Egypt from the expanding Roman Empire. In doing so she formed relationships with two of Rome’s most powerful leaders, Marc Anthony and Julius Caesar.

Mary Magdalene (4 BCE–40BCE) Accounts from the Gospels and other sources suggest Mary Magdalene was one of Jesus’ most devoted followers. Mary Magdalene stood near Jesus at his crucifixion and was the first to see his resurreBoudicca (1st Century CE) Boudicca was an inspirational leader of the Britons. She led several tribes in revolt against the Roman occupation. Initially successful, her army of 100,000 sacked Colchester and then London. Her army was later defHildegard of Bingen (1098–1179) Mystic, author and composer. Hildegard of Bingen lived a withdrawn life, spending most of her time behind convent walls. However, her writings, poetry and music were revelatory for the time period. She was consulted by popes, kings and influential people of the time. Her writings and music have influenced people to thil.

Eleanor of Aquitaine (1122–1204) The first Queen of France. Two of her sons Richard and John went on to become Kings of England. Educated, beautiful and highly articulate, Eleanor influenced the politics of western Europe through her alliances and influence over her sons.

Joan of Arc (1412–1431) The patron saint of France, Joan of Arc inspired a French revolt against the occupation of the English. An unlikely hero, at the age of just 17, the diminutive Joan successfully led the French to victory at Orleans. Her later trial and martyrdom only heightened her mystique.

Mirabai (1498–1565) Indian mystic and poet. Mirabai was born into a privileged Hindu family, but she forsook the expectations of a princess and spent her time as a mystic and devotee of Sri Krishna. She helped revitalise the tradition of bhakti (devotional) yoga in India.

St Teresa of Avila (1515–1582) Spanish mystic, poet and Carmelite reformer. St Teresa of Avila lived through the Spanish inquisition but avoided being placed on trial despite her mystical revelations. She helped to reform the tradition of Catholicism and steer the religion away from fanaticism.

Catherine de Medici (1519–1589) Born in Florence, Italy, Catherine was married to the King of France at the age of 14. She was involved in interminable political machinations seeking to increase the power of her favoured sons. This led to the disastrous St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre.

Elizabeth I (1533–1603) Queen of England during a time of great economic and social change, she saw England cemented as a Protestant country. During her reign, she witnessed the defeat of the Spanish Armada leaving Britain to later become one of the world’s dominant superpowers.

Catherine the Great (1729–1796) One of the greatest political leaders of the Eighteenth Century. Catherine the Great was said to have played an important role in improving the welfare of Russian serfs. She placed great emphasis on the arts and helped to cement Russia as one of the dominant countries in Europe.

Mary Wollstonecraft (1759–1797) English author, Wollstonecraft wrote the most significant book in the early feminist movement. Her pamphlet “A Vindication of the Rights of Women”laid down a moral and practical basis for extending human and political rights to women. She was a pioneer in the struggle for female suffrage.

Jane Austen (1775–1817) One of the most famous female authors of all time, Jane Austen wrote several novels, which remain highly popular today. These include Pride and Prejudice, Emma and Northanger Abbey. Jane Austen wrote at a time when female writers were not encouraged, helping pave the way for future writers.

Sojourner Truth(1797 – 1883) African-American abolitionist and women’s rights campaigner. In 1851, gave a famous extemporaneous speech “Ain’t I a woman?” which explained in plain language how women were equal to men.

Margaret Fuller (1810–1850) An American women’s rights advocate. Her book Women in the Nineteenth Century(1845) was influential in changing perceptions about men and women, and was one of the most important early feminist works. She argued for equality and women being more self-dependent and less dependent on men.

Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811–1896) A lifelong anti-slavery campaigner. Her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin was a bestseller and helped to popularise the anti-slavery campaign. Abraham Lincoln later remarked that her books were a major factor behind the American civil war.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815–1902) American social activist and leading figure in the early women’s rights movement. She was a key figure in helping create the early women’s suffrage movements in the US. She was the principle author of Declaration of Sentiments in 1848.

Queen Victoria (1819–1901) British Queen. Presiding over one of the largest empires ever seen, Queen Victoria was the head of state from 1837 – 1901. Queen Victoria sought to gain an influence in British politics whilst remaining aloof from party politics. She came to symbolise a whole era of Victorian values.

Florence Nightingale (1820–1910) British nurse. By serving in the Crimean war, Florence Nightingale was instrumental in changing the role and perception of the nursing profession. Her dedicated service won widespread admiration and led to a significant improvement in the treatment of wounded soldiers.

Susan B. Anthony(1820–1906) American Campaigner against slavery and for the promotion of women’s and workers rights. She began campaigning within the temperance movement and this convinced her of the necessity for women to have the vote. She toured the US giving countless speeches on the subjects of human rights.

Elizabeth Blackwell( 1821–1910) Born in Britain, Blackwell was the first woman to receive a medical degree in America and the first woman to be on the UK medical register. Blackwell helped to break down social barriers, enabling women to be accepted as doctors.

Emily Dickinson (1830–1886) One of America’s greatest poets, Emily Dickinson lived most of her life in seclusion. Her poems were published posthumously and received widespread literary praise for their bold and unconventional style. Her poetic style left a significant legacy on 20th Century poetry.

Millicent Fawcett (1846–1929) A leading suffragist and campaigner for equal rights for women. She led Britain’s biggest suffrage organisation, the non-violent (NUWSS) and played a key role in gaining women the vote. She also helped found Newnham College, Cambridge.

Emmeline Pankhurst (1858–1928) A British suffragette, Emily Pankhurst dedicated her life to the promotion of women’s rights. She explored all avenues of protest including violence, public demonstrations and hunger strikes. She died in 1928, 3 weeks before a law giving all women over 21 the right to vote.

Marie Curie (1867–1934) Polish/French scientist. Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize and the first person to win the Nobel Prize for two separate categories. Her first award was for research into radioactivity (Physics, 1903). Her second Nobel prize was for Chemistry in 1911. A few years later she also helped develop the first X-ray machines.

Emily Murphy (1868–1933) The first woman magistrate in the British Empire. In 1927 she joined forces with four other Canadian women who sought to challenge an old Canadian law that said, “women should not be counted as persons.”

Rosa Luxemburg (1870–1919) Polish/German Marxist revolutionary, Rosa Luxemburg sought to bring social reform to Germany. She wrote fiercely against German imperialism and for international socialism. In 1919, she was murdered after a failed attempt to bring about a Communist revolution in Germany.

Helena Rubinstein (1870–1965) American businesswoman. Rubinstein formed one of the world’s first cosmetic companies. Her business enterprise proved immensely successful and, later in life, she used her enormous wealth to support charitable enterprises in the field of education, art and health.

Helen Keller (1880–1968) American social activist. At the age of 19 months, Helen became deaf and blind. Overcoming the frustration of losing both sight and hearing she campaigned tirelessly on behalf of deaf and blind people.

Coco Chanel (1883–1971) French fashion designer. One of the most innovative fashion designers, Coco Chanel was instrumental in defining feminine style and dress during the 20th Century. Her ideas were revolutionary; in particular she often took traditionally male clothes and redesigned them for the benefit of women.

Eleanor Roosevelt (1884–1962) Wife and political aide of American president F.D.Roosevelt. In her own right Eleanor made a significant contribution to the field of human rights, a topic she campaigned upon throughout her life. As head of UN human rights commission she helped to draft the 1948 UN declaration of human rights.

Annie Besant (1847–1933) British campaigner for social justice, an advocate of women’s rights and later member of the Theosophist society. She also actively campaigned for Indian independence.

Katharine Hepburn (1907–2003) American actress. An iconic figure of twentieth Century film, Katharine Hepburn won four Oscars and received over twelve Oscar nominations. Her lifestyle was unconventional for the time and through her acting and life, she helped redefine traditional views of women’s roles in society.

Simone de Beauvoir (1908–1986) French existentialist philosopher. Simone de Beauvoir developed a close personal and int

These all are the women who changed the world by their wonder, it may be their love, art, music, war, power …All, all by their wonders

Each or other way we also have that wonder within us. We are the strong pillar. Love yourself , always remember, you are the wonderful part of the world.

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